Country

Country Music (Extracts from Wikipedia)

The first generation emerged in the early 1920s, with Atlanta’s music scene playing a major role in launching country’s earliest recording artists.

During the second generation (1930s–1940s), radio became a popular source of entertainment, and “barn dance” shows featuring country music were started all over the South, as far north as Chicago, and as far west as California.

The third generation (1950s–1960s) started at the end of World War II with “mountaineer” string band music known as bluegrass, which emerged when Bill Monroe, along with Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs were introduced by Roy Acuff at the Grand Ole Opry.

Fourth generation (1970s–1980s) music included outlaw country with roots in the Bakersfield sound, and country pop with roots in the countrypolitan, folk music and soft rock.

During the fifth generation (1990s), country music became a worldwide phenomenon thanks to Garth Brooks and Alan Jackson. The Dixie Chicks became one of the most popular country bands in the 1990s and early 2000s.

The sixth generation (2000s–present) is exemplified by country singer Carrie Underwood. The influence of rock music in country has become more overt during the late 2000s and early 2010s. Hip-hop also made its mark on country music with the emergence of country rap.

Wikipedia link (go)